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Demystifying Medicine One Month at a Time

Does Medical Marketing Work?

20140929-dollars-for-docs-300x200_1You bet it does.

In the ‘old days,’ doctors were taken on junkets to sunny destinations and indoctrinated with the latest and greatest in brand name medications. The trips were paid for by the pharmaceutical firms that manufactured these drugs.

Trips like this started to become unseemly, and the public began demanding more transparency in the relationships their doctors had with drug companies. A database was created to keep track of the monies flowing to docs from drug companies.

Docs can still get a meal (as long as it’s ‘educational,’ i.e. there’s a lecture along with it) and the traditional branded pens and pads of paper for the office. Sometimes drug reps (the sales people for the pharma firms, known in the trade as ‘detailers’) bring by bagels or doughnuts to woo the staff and steal a few minutes to tell us about their latest product.

The big money comes to the select few who become ‘thought leaders,’ i.e. spokespeople on behalf of certain drugs. This can range from five to six figures. Per year.

Docs have always been a little defensive about having these relationships explored or highlighted. “No drug company influences the way I prescribe,” is a common sentiment.

“I prescribe the best products that are on the market,” is another retort — not hard to defend, as the brand name drugs create the perception (at least) of being the best.

Conventional wisdom has always held that drug companies wouldn’t spend the billions that they do on marketing if it wasn’t beneficial. Proof of that has been hard to come by, though, as there wasn’t a way to clearly demonstrate a relationship between drug company payments and the rate of prescribing brand name (i.e. heavily marketed, more expensive) drugs.

Now there is.

In a beautifully conceived and executed investigative report, the non-profit news source ProPublica has linked the pharma payment database with the Medicare Part D (which since 2003 has paid for prescription drugs for seniors) database.

You know what?

There’s a perfectly linear correlation: Docs that receive payments (in one database) prescribe more brand name drugs (from the other database).

Nothing about this is illegal. There’s no doubt that some of the doctors receiving payments genuinely believe the brand-name products they prescribe are better. It’s just that no one can claim with a straight face any longer that payments to doctors don’t influence the way we prescribe.

(Mind you, the drug companies have known this all along, but have kept this information private as ‘proprietary’ information. Trade secrets, you know.)

If you like this kind of reporting, you can listen to a story about the investigation here:

4 Comments

  1. Joshua Sherman

    March 22, 2016 at 5:51 pm

    This is a very interesting subject. Thank you for enlightening me with this intriguing information.

  2. I know it’s not illegal, and I don’t think it should be. But it is kind of immoral, isn’t it? A doctor should prescribe the best drug for a person’s condition – not the one that they’re getting paid to prescribe. It makes me worry about how frequently people are being prescribed things they don’t even really need because there’s money involved.

  3. Thanks for sharing this information. I hadn’t heard about the ProPublica report– it’s helpful as we understand the impact these marketing efforts have on care and medication decisions.

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