Have you heard of Doximity? There’s no reason why you would, unless you’re in the medical world.

Think of it as LinkedIn for doctors and other health care pros. Launched in 2011, Doximity now claims that more than 70% of U.S. physicians are members. If it’s true, that’s a pretty impressive number/captive audience.

They started an authors’ program, where medical pundits offer monthly columns.

My focus has always been on demystifying medicine for non-medical audiences, but I want to see if I can broaden the audience a bit.

My first column was a topic I’ve broached here before: how hospitals go quiet on weekends, which seems nonsensical to me. You can read it here.

The second monthly column just went up; it’s an exploration of why so much dialysis in the U.S. for people with end-stage renal disease (i.e. kidney failure) is of the variety known as “hemodialysis” as opposed to “peritoneal dialysis.” HD mostly involves patients going to centers three times a week for 3-4 hour sessions–which makes maintaining employment darn near impossible.

PD occurs at night, at home, and interestingly it works better (fewer side effects and better longevity) and it’s cheaper overall. So why do only 10% of dialysis patients use it?

In a word, money.

But the good news is that’s changing. Expect to see a significant increase in peritoneal dialysis in the next 5 years–from 10% of patients with end-stage renal disease, to 20% or more. You can read about it here.