GlassHospital

Demystifying Medicine One Week at a Time

Category: media (page 1 of 10)

I Floated for NPR — To Achieve Some Inner Calm.

Brigham Braces for Uncertain Future

If you’re interested in healthcare, health finance, and technology, consider adding STAT to your favorites. It’s a smart, online-only publication from the Boston Globe that features a great mix of seasoned health care journalism and many new voices (including an excellent first-person column).

This recent article by Ron Winslow (recently retired from 30+ years at the Wall St. Journal) is a great case in point:

Winslow adeptly takes readers though some of the tough decisions around budgeting at the august Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. “The Brigham,” as it’s known, is a mecca for advanced specialty care, medical research, and a major affiliate of Harvard Medical School.

Teaching hospitals are complex economic engines, both bringing in and spending hundreds of millions (billions, in some markets) of dollars.

Such academic centers have long had a reliable flow of federal dollars through Medicare for patient care and resident training, as well as research grants though the National Institutes of Health.

But both of these resources are challenged as the federal budget for research and development grows ever more uncertain.

In addition, hospitals are under tremendous cost pressure (and deservedly so!) from insurers, who bargain to get beneficiaries better rates–and make the health care dollar stretch further.

Take a look a Winslow’s piece. If you’re at all interested in business, finance, economics, and/or health care, you will learn a lot about process in complex organizations. I’m guessing we will be seeing a lot more of this in the health care world.

Kudos to Winslow and STAT for a great investigative piece and to the Brigham for providing transparency into their finances and decision-making processes.

“Crowding,” and Other Items

The stock market is up. But the economy sputters along–it grows, but only slowly.

The health care sector has been an exception to the trend of slow growth. It continues to employ more Americans than ever before, without much sign of slowing down.

[Correction. Here’s a sign of some slowing.]

The health care industry has become so huge that it comprises nearly 1/5 of the economy. Now 1/9 American workers are somehow in health care (think medical coders, billing specialists, and various administrators). It’s astonishing. Whole cities (Hello Cleveland, Pittsburgh, etc., etc.) rely on health care as their #1 sources of jobs/income/investment.

[For a superb treatment of this phenomenon, read Chad Terhune’s piece here.]

A while back I read a great essay by a health care pundit who talked of health care spending “crowding out” other forms of public investment.

Think of it this way: a government collects taxes. If it spends an increasing amount on health care goods and services each year, there is less available for education, roads, infrastructure, etc.

It may not quite be a zero sum game, but it’s darn close.


Don’t You Just Love Those Drug Ads on TV?

I wrote new essay for NPR’s health blog, Shots, in honor of the 20th anniversary of drug ads appearing on TV in the U.S.

You can click on the box below to have a look. It ran with more great collage art by @KatStreeter.

Match Day 2017

Click on the link below to see an essay from NPR on learning from and working with foreign medical graduates.

All in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, which this year is also Match Day — when medical students learn where they will match for residency — the next chapter in their training.

Truckers Against Trafficking

Kylla Lanier

A loyal reader has noticed the paucity of recent posts and suggested offering links to my radio interviews as a means of facilitating ease of listening.

Recently I interviewed Kylla Lanier, co-founder and deputy director of a non-profit called Truckers Against Trafficking. TAT is devoted to educating more than 400,000 truckers and owners and employees of truck stops about signs of human trafficking–which occurs to an estimated hundreds of thousands of Americans, both native and foreign born.

Trafficking has victims in both the sex industry and in general labor — including hospitality, food service and agriculture. Anyone forced to work against their will and paid for their labor is considered trafficked.

Click on over and you can stream the interview at your leisure. I learned a lot.

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