GlassHospital

Demystifying Medicine One Week at a Time

Category: mental health (page 1 of 2)

Social Hospitals?

Evolution of hospitals is a theme we’ve visited before.  A couple of years ago, these words appeared in GlassHospital:

I once had a teacher tell me, “No one should ever need to be in a hospital. Except for some cardiac conditions that require immediate care, the only people winding up in hospitals are frail elders, and those with social problems and no place to go — the mentally ill, the destitute, the homeless.” I remember feeling a bit shocked by this, but as I reflected on it, I realized he had a point. I should start with the assumption, he told me, “that almost no one really needs to be there and they’re better off at home.”

Hospitals have their origins as almshouses, places where the poor could go to seek care and sustenance. Over time, they co-evolved to become places of teaching, and in the early 20th century university-based medical schools partnered with charity hospitals in particular to train future generations of doctors.

Now a recent NY Times  op-ed  asks, “Are Hospitals Becoming Obsolete?”

Medicine has advanced so that many illnesses and procedures that used to require days in the hospital now can be treated in an office setting. It seems the more we study it, the more we realize that people do better when they convalesce in their home environments.

Another recent article discussed an additional factor contributing to the demise of hospitals: hospital at home. WHY NOT have medical care in your home, including IV therapy and even advanced procedures like dialysis if they’re available and they work?

One other line of reasoning asks about HOW we apportion hospital beds, suggesting that maybe we’ve de-commissioned too many psychiatric beds for treating people with severe mental illness. Given the horrible shooting sprees in the news recently, several commentators are asking if it’s time to re-invest in mental hospitals.

One idea here: if hospitals continue to consolidate and atrophy, perhaps we should re-purpose them to more ably handle social issues that continually confront us: nutrition, jobs, education, housing, etc., etc.–by offering services and information for people with those needs.

The question is how we structure and finance that transition.

I Floated for NPR — To Achieve Some Inner Calm.

Public Libraries

Artist’s rendering of Central Library. It turned out as good as it looks.

In Tulsa the flagship downtown Central Library just re-opened after a three-year renovation.

It’s been spectacularly re-designed and updated with all of the latest library technology. It includes the nation’s only (to this point) embedded Starbucks Coffee–a plus or minus depending on your viewpoint. (Some academic libraries at universities already contain them.)

A recent newspaper article profiled another important feature of the Tulsa library: A full-time social worker.

As you may or may not know, depending on where you live and how much you use your public library, urban libraries are often visited by people in transition–those that are jobless, homeless, and who frequently have stable or unstable mental illness.

After all–libraries are free, have resources, generally have available computer time and tutorials, and kind librarians who can help with requests.

Many libraries now have social workers and other representatives of social service agencies that can help with issues like finding places to live, regular sources of food, and employment options.

I was glad to read about Deborah Hunter in Tulsa. Her story is all the more poignant because she’s driven by the fact that her own daughter was diagnosed with schizophrenia–a challenge that propelled her to get a professional degree.

I love our new library, and I’m glad that the library and Tulsa’s Family and Children’s Services are doing what they can to offer help to those in need.

Mushrooms: Magic?

3/22/2013--Shelton, WA, USA Pioppini mushrooms (Agrocybe aegerita) from Fungi Perfecti. Paul Stamets, 57, is an American mycologist, author, and advocate of bioremediation and medicinal mushrooms and owner of Fungi Perfecti, a family run business that specializes in making gourmet and medicinal mushrooms. ©2013 Stuart Isett. All rights reserved.

©2013 Stuart Isett.

In ‘study of the week’ news, major media outlets reported on two small studies looking at the possible benefits of the chemical psilocybin, the ingredient found in psychedelic mushrooms.

Both studies were conducted in volunteers with cancer, who also had concomitant depression and anxiety–assumed related to their cancer.

The interesting headline-grabbing finding was that after a single dose (“trip”) with psilocybin, a majority of patients in both trials reported improved mood, decreases in mental health symptoms, and positive experiences with the drug (i.e. good trips).

Here’s the kicker: 6 months after their trips, without additional drug, many of the study participants still reported improved mental health.

Study 1 was conducted at NYU and involved 29 patients. The study found that at 6.5 months, “60-80% of the participants continued with clinical significant reductions in depression or anxiety.”

The second study was conducted at Johns Hopkins, involved 51 patients, and had similar findings. Note how the second study describes the orchestration of its sessions:

Psilocybin sessions

Drug sessions were conducted in an aesthetic living-room-like environment with two monitors present. Participants were instructed to consume a low-fat breakfast before coming to the research unit. A urine sample was taken to verify abstinence from common drugs of abuse (cocaine, benzodiazepines, and opioids including methadone)….

For most of the time during the session, participants were encouraged to lie down on the couch, use an eye mask to block external visual distraction, and use headphones through which a music program was played. The same music program was played for all participants in both sessions. Participants were encouraged to focus their attention on their inner experiences throughout the session. Thus, there was no explicit instruction for participants to focus on their attitudes, ideas, or emotions related to their cancer.

Both studies appeared in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. While I agree this news is of general interest, I think the media reporting on the studies is overly sensational. Many doubts remain about the safety of psilocybin. Cancer patients–and indeed the lay public–are vulnerable to this sort of unchecked hype. Issues unaddressed:

  • Negative effects of psilocybin (i.e. no reporting on any adverse effects)–which were listed in the studies
  • Cost
  • Alternatives
  • Small sample sizes in the studies

Overall, I’m glad that researchers are reconsidering ideas long thought too risky or out of bounds. But more science needs to be done before psilocybin is ready for mainstream use.

Anxiety

How are you feeling post-election?

In the practice of medicine, we use validated questionnaires like the PHQ-9 to screen for depression or the GAD-7 to screen for anxiety.

My wife, a family doctor, administered the GAD-7 to a patient of hers this week; post-election, I started wondering how many Americans could be diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder* right now.

Go ahead and take the quiz yourself:

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What’s your score?

A score of five or more indicates mild symptoms. Ten or more moves you to moderate. Fifteen or more means you are highly likely to have diagnosable anxiety disorder–what the experts call generalized anxiety disorder.*

If you’re in this highest category, think about getting help. You can start with your primary care physician. She can help you directly or refer you to other community mental health resources that can be helpful.

*Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5):

A. Excessive anxiety and worry (apprehensive expectation), occurring more days than not for at least 6 months, about a number of events or activities (such as work or school performance).
B. The individual finds it difficult to control the worry.
C. The anxiety and worry are associated with three (or more) of the following six symptoms (with at least some symptoms having been present for more days than not for the past 6 months):
Note: Only one item is required in children.

  1. Restlessness or feeling keyed up or on edge.
  2. Being easily fatigued.
  3. Difficulty concentrating or mind going blank.
  4. Irritability.
  5. Muscle tension.
  6. Sleep disturbance (difficulty falling or staying asleep, or restless, unsatisfying sleep).

D. The anxiety, worry, or physical symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.
E. The disturbance is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or another medical condition (e.g., hyperthyroidism).

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