GlassHospital

Demystifying Medicine One Month at a Time

Tag: NPR Shots

Costs of Care Redux: Extremis Edition

It’s not new to GlassHospital readers, but coverage of outrageous health care bills in the United States is having a bit of a moment.

At least two major news sources, NPR and Vox, are running series in which people who have received bills for health care that seem outrageous can share them with investigative journalists and get help.

Based on the success of her book An American Sickness, doctor/journalist/editor Elisabeth Rosenthal and Kaiser Health News are working with NPR to produce one of these stories for web and radio every month.

Story #1 told of a urine test (screening for drugs) that was billed at $17,850. This is not a joke.

Story #2 compared the difference in price between the same CT scan performed at a hospital vs. a freestanding radiology center. [Hint: hospitals are MUCH more expensive places to get tests done.] The same CT scan of a man’s abdomen performed at a local hospital was billed at thirty-three times the price of the outpatient center.

The most recent story featured a disabled Oklahoma librarian, who had surgery on her arthritic foot. When she had sticker shock at the charge of more than $115,000 for her surgery and three day hospital stay, she did a smart thing and asked for an itemized bill. The most outrageous finding? A charge of $15,076 for four tiny screws implanted in her foot.

The moral of these stories is a) hospitals and laboratories can egregiously mark up their prices, without warning, clarity, or fairness; b) if you are faced with such a bill, you simply MUST ask for an itemized list of charges if you want any hope of contesting them.

If you think charges for actual care can be outrageous, how about being charged for NOT getting care?

Vox tells one woman’s story of fainting, going to a nearby Emergency Department, then declining to be treated. Why did she decline? Fear of an exorbitant bill.

So what happened?

After being given an ice pack and a bandage, she declined treatment, went home, and subsequently received a bill for $5,751.

“Crowding,” and Other Items

The stock market is up. But the economy sputters along–it grows, but only slowly.

The health care sector has been an exception to the trend of slow growth. It continues to employ more Americans than ever before, without much sign of slowing down.

[Correction. Here’s a sign of some slowing.]

The health care industry has become so huge that it comprises nearly 1/5 of the economy. Now 1/9 American workers are somehow in health care (think medical coders, billing specialists, and various administrators). It’s astonishing. Whole cities (Hello Cleveland, Pittsburgh, etc., etc.) rely on health care as their #1 sources of jobs/income/investment.

[For a superb treatment of this phenomenon, read Chad Terhune’s piece here.]

A while back I read a great essay by a health care pundit who talked of health care spending “crowding out” other forms of public investment.

Think of it this way: a government collects taxes. If it spends an increasing amount on health care goods and services each year, there is less available for education, roads, infrastructure, etc.

It may not quite be a zero sum game, but it’s darn close.


Don’t You Just Love Those Drug Ads on TV?

I wrote new essay for NPR’s health blog, Shots, in honor of the 20th anniversary of drug ads appearing on TV in the U.S.

You can click on the box below to have a look. It ran with more great collage art by @KatStreeter.

Column Laurel

Good news dept:

2016-Column-Contest-560x469Dear loyal GlassHospital readers–

GlassHospital was recently recognized by the National Society of Newspaper Columnists as a finalist for columnist of the year in the Online, Blog, and Multimedia Category with >100,000 readers. This is for work published on the world’s best health care site, NPR’s Shots blog [to which I attribute such high readership — you loyalists on this site are in much more select company].

I was awarded third place, behind a Reuters columnist who works to bring broader understanding of Islam to a large general readership, and a columnist from The Street who writes frequently to expose scams and complicated investment schemes that over-promise and under-deliver. Given all that’s going on in the news cycles of late, I think this makes perfect cosmic sense.

I do my best to share NPR work on this site to attract you over there, but if you’re interested in the columns for which I won the award, links to them are below.

  1. From August 2015 — Suicide: not a natural cause of death
  2. From April 2015 — How should we educate 21st century doctors?
  3. From September 2015 — For older folks, pruning back prescriptions can bring better health

Thanks for reading!

Wrestling with My Inner Trump

medical-deportation_wide-d8d3587daba3c4885aabbfe681ada9e50a893091-s800-c85In a new NPR column I recall a time when my team and I had to decide on the best hospital discharge plan for a newly disabled, undocumented immigrant.

Immigration is always a pretty hot-button issue, never more so than during Presidential elections.

Wonderful accompanying art by Lorenzo Gritti.

When medicine and commerce collide, who is lost along the way?

Posted by NPR on Sunday, April 10, 2016

Medical Me-Tooism

mediacalmetooism4b_wide-cf5d190b9eea4633b75292465de7ecb0d66a1bcf-s800-c85My father turns 78 in a few weeks. Though in my medical (and filial) opinion he’s aging well, he begs to differ — seeing his own aging as the piling on of indignities and infirmities.

Everything is relative, though, as he’s often taught me. When he compares himself to his peers, he often wonders if he should be undergoing the same medical routines and procedures that they are. My advice when he feels that impulse: Take a heavy dose of caution.

I wrote about this in an essay for NPR, accompanied by a wonderful collage by Katherine Streeter. Please click on the picture and take a look.

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