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Tag: Vox

Costs of Care Redux: Extremis Edition

It’s not new to GlassHospital readers, but coverage of outrageous health care bills in the United States is having a bit of a moment.

At least two major news sources, NPR and Vox, are running series in which people who have received bills for health care that seem outrageous can share them with investigative journalists and get help.

Based on the success of her book An American Sickness, doctor/journalist/editor Elisabeth Rosenthal and Kaiser Health News are working with NPR to produce one of these stories for web and radio every month.

Story #1 told of a urine test (screening for drugs) that was billed at $17,850. This is not a joke.

Story #2 compared the difference in price between the same CT scan performed at a hospital vs. a freestanding radiology center. [Hint: hospitals are MUCH more expensive places to get tests done.] The same CT scan of a man’s abdomen performed at a local hospital was billed at thirty-three times the price of the outpatient center.

The most recent story featured a disabled Oklahoma librarian, who had surgery on her arthritic foot. When she had sticker shock at the charge of more than $115,000 for her surgery and three day hospital stay, she did a smart thing and asked for an itemized bill. The most outrageous finding? A charge of $15,076 for four tiny screws implanted in her foot.

The moral of these stories is a) hospitals and laboratories can egregiously mark up their prices, without warning, clarity, or fairness; b) if you are faced with such a bill, you simply MUST ask for an itemized list of charges if you want any hope of contesting them.

If you think charges for actual care can be outrageous, how about being charged for NOT getting care?

Vox tells one woman’s story of fainting, going to a nearby Emergency Department, then declining to be treated. Why did she decline? Fear of an exorbitant bill.

So what happened?

After being given an ice pack and a bandage, she declined treatment, went home, and subsequently received a bill for $5,751.

How to Age Better: Live somewhere that combats Loneliness, Helplessness, and Boredom

At GlassHospital we strive to bring you interesting ideas about improving health and health care from places far and wide:

An article in the Saskatoon (Saskatchewan) StarPhoenix features Suellen Beatty, CEO of the Sherbrooke Community Centre in Canada.

Sherbrooke is a community centre, but it also is home to more than 250 residents — the kind of place we might call a ‘nursing home’ in the U.S. I love that in Canada they’re called Community Centres. That’s what any facility or neighborhood should strive for.

Suellen Beatty rejects the idea that nursing homes are places where people go to await death. Her team’s philosophy is to make old age more fun. Sherbrooke readily acknowledges the big three elements that compound the infirmities of aging: Loneliness, helplessness, and BOREDOM.

By loading up the day with activities, by listening to their residents and families, and by hosting hundreds of volunteers who see their job as providing fun and emotional sustenance to resident and day-visitor elders, Sherbrooke attracts visitors from all over the world who marvel at its success.

It reminds me a of a piece we ran a few years ago about a pretty special elder care facility in Arizona–one that put its residents’ happiness and comfort above all else — even when it means deviating from ‘standard’ protocols of elder care like eating bland food.

Take a look at what’s going on in Saskatchewan. We can all learn.

Marching for Science

Another piece I recommend: This time from Vox, in their First Person section.

It’s an essay by someone close to me who appreciates the scientific advancements which will help her survive the breast cancer she’s just been diagnosed with.

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