GlassHospital

Demystifying Medicine One Week at a Time

How to Age Better: Live somewhere that combats Loneliness, Helplessness, and Boredom

At GlassHospital we strive to bring you interesting ideas about improving health and health care from places far and wide:

An article in the Saskatoon (Saskatchewan) StarPhoenix features Suellen Beatty, CEO of the Sherbrooke Community Centre in Canada.

Sherbrooke is a community centre, but it also is home to more than 250 residents — the kind of place we might call a ‘nursing home’ in the U.S. I love that in Canada they’re called Community Centres. That’s what any facility or neighborhood should strive for.

Suellen Beatty rejects the idea that nursing homes are places where people go to await death. Her team’s philosophy is to make old age more fun. Sherbrooke readily acknowledges the big three elements that compound the infirmities of aging: Loneliness, helplessness, and BOREDOM.

By loading up the day with activities, by listening to their residents and families, and by hosting hundreds of volunteers who see their job as providing fun and emotional sustenance to resident and day-visitor elders, Sherbrooke attracts visitors from all over the world who marvel at its success.

It reminds me a of a piece we ran a few years ago about a pretty special elder care facility in Arizona–one that put its residents’ happiness and comfort above all else — even when it means deviating from ‘standard’ protocols of elder care like eating bland food.

Take a look at what’s going on in Saskatchewan. We can all learn.

Marching for Science

Another piece I recommend: This time from Vox, in their First Person section.

It’s an essay by someone close to me who appreciates the scientific advancements which will help her survive the breast cancer she’s just been diagnosed with.

The ‘One Stop Shop’

“How can you expect patients to look after their health, when they don’t know where they will be living next week? You can not separate people’s physical health from their psychological, social and spiritual health.”

So asked community health nurse Ruth Chorley, in an article by Rachel Pugh in the Guardian.

The story reported on a local program in Oldham, one of the UK’s National Health Service districts, in which nurse specialists work to help people whose social and economic problems prevent them from managing their health.

From the story:

Chorley is a focused care practitioner – one of four employed by Hope Citadel Healthcare, a not-for-profit community interest company, to lead a pioneering approach to delivering healthcare to the most needy families in its four Greater Manchester NHS GP practices, by filling in the gaps between health and social care.

I think this small scale NHS experiment is one right way to truly improve a  community’s health.

Match Day 2017

Click on the link below to see an essay from NPR on learning from and working with foreign medical graduates.

All in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, which this year is also Match Day — when medical students learn where they will match for residency — the next chapter in their training.

Truckers Against Trafficking

Kylla Lanier

A loyal reader has noticed the paucity of recent posts and suggested offering links to my radio interviews as a means of facilitating ease of listening.

Recently I interviewed Kylla Lanier, co-founder and deputy director of a non-profit called Truckers Against Trafficking. TAT is devoted to educating more than 400,000 truckers and owners and employees of truck stops about signs of human trafficking–which occurs to an estimated hundreds of thousands of Americans, both native and foreign born.

Trafficking has victims in both the sex industry and in general labor — including hospitality, food service and agriculture. Anyone forced to work against their will and paid for their labor is considered trafficked.

Click on over and you can stream the interview at your leisure. I learned a lot.

Public Libraries

Artist’s rendering of Central Library. It turned out as good as it looks.

In Tulsa the flagship downtown Central Library just re-opened after a three-year renovation.

It’s been spectacularly re-designed and updated with all of the latest library technology. It includes the nation’s only (to this point) embedded Starbucks Coffee–a plus or minus depending on your viewpoint. (Some academic libraries at universities already contain them.)

A recent newspaper article profiled another important feature of the Tulsa library: A full-time social worker.

As you may or may not know, depending on where you live and how much you use your public library, urban libraries are often visited by people in transition–those that are jobless, homeless, and who frequently have stable or unstable mental illness.

After all–libraries are free, have resources, generally have available computer time and tutorials, and kind librarians who can help with requests.

Many libraries now have social workers and other representatives of social service agencies that can help with issues like finding places to live, regular sources of food, and employment options.

I was glad to read about Deborah Hunter in Tulsa. Her story is all the more poignant because she’s driven by the fact that her own daughter was diagnosed with schizophrenia–a challenge that propelled her to get a professional degree.

I love our new library, and I’m glad that the library and Tulsa’s Family and Children’s Services are doing what they can to offer help to those in need.

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